with fluidity

Two-channel audio walk
14 minutes 07s

Artists’ book
12 pages, 129mm x 181mm, plus double sided A3 fold-out poster
Designed and printed on risograph by Alice Bush at Ilam Press

Project launched Sunday July 12, 2015
Supported by The Physics Room.

With Fluidity is a project with Susie Pratt that consists of two parts: an audio walk and an artists’ book, which examine the tensions between Ōtākaro/Avon River as a founding icon of Christchurch city, and as a major contributor to the city’s destruction through earthquake induced liquefaction. The project takes the constantly shifting flows of Ōtākaro/Avon River as a model to propose alternative ways of thinking about and inhabiting the city.

The audio walk invites participants to be guided along the river while listening to audio that includes found sounds, manipulated sounds and fragments of spoken text. The artists’ book poses a series of questions, “How do the river and the city choreograph each other? What turns is the city making?” and responds to these through a visual essay.

paper :

interior turbulence

2012-cloud_sound-04

‘Interior Turbulence and the Thresholding of Atmospheres’, my paper on the installation project Cloud Sound has been published in the Interstices issue ‘Atmospheres and Affect’ edited by Andrew Douglas. The full paper is available here.

Abstract: Turbulence, understood as a disruptive process of coming together, offers a productive metaphor for making sense of the complex dynamics involved in the formation and design of atmospheres. This paper extends the idea of turbulence to spatial, material, experiential and disciplinary registers, and examines the varied and sometimes contradictory forces that exist between them, with reference to an architectural installation project, Cloud Sound.

An understanding of atmospheres as always in negotiation across a region of turbulence, rather than a static well-defined boundary, is developed. Cloud Sound sustains this uncertainty by keeping things unfixed and in play, part of an active process that I call thresholding. This concept is supported by a discussion of the ambiguity of atmospheres and how they disrupt distinctions between organisms and their environments, something that has implications for expanded disciplinary practises.

paper : kissing the sky


A recently completed journal article, submitted for publication in the IDEA Journal issue ‘Writing/Drawing: Negotiating the Pleasures and Perils of Interiority. Edited by Sarah Treadwell.
Image courtesy of kalevkevad via flickr.

Abstract: Interiority typically constructs an ambience, or atmosphere, distinct from the unruly weather–atmosphere of the exterior. But this relationship is more complicated than mere separation; the exterior and interior are held together in a dynamic interplay of atmospheres, surfaces, materials and perceptions. This interplay is foregrounded in the work of James Turrell, whose projects engage in the complexity of this relationship, and embrace ambiguous and oscillating readings of inside and outside. Drawing attention to these inter–connections disrupts our habitual attention and invites a reconsideration of the categories we employ that allow us to make useful sense of the world.

This paper will discuss an installation by Turrell called Meeting, in reference to Sylvia Lavin’s notion of kissing, an extended metaphor which uses the term in both its bodily and geometric senses. Kissing will be used to think through the relationships present in an experience of Turrell’s work. I will examine how combinations of our bodies, atmosphere–weathers, and atmosphere–ambiences, intermix to create new, durationally dependent definitions of threshold, which complicate the interior and distinguish it from the discipline of architecture.

LAND. HERE. publication

LAND_HERE cover

This publication collects a number of works from my Wild Creations residency in Fox Glacier, including student works from the GPS drawing workshop that I offered. Though documenting mostly video works, they are adapted to the book format to give a sense of their intended presentation. The publication is introduced by Joe Gerlach, a lecturer in geography at the University of Oxford.

There are plans for a physical edition of the publication, but for now it is available for download as an electronic publication.

Piran Spregovori /

Piran Speaks

Polaroid images in hand-bound artists’ book, edition of one.
30 pages plus fold out map and key, 90 x 110mm
Exhibited at Piran Town Hall, Piran, Slovenia.
Now held in the collection of Mesta knjiznica Piran – Public Library of Piran.
April 2009

This book was produced in collaboration with Sally Janssen during a residency in Piran, Slovenia. We set out to explore how the spaces of the town communicated their functions. Through the performative aspect of producing the book we sought to inject fresh energy into the town.

With the help of Sonja Kocevar we organised a series of staged photographs where local residents enacted scenes emphasising the purpose of the various town’s spaces in a comical manner. The book was intended as an alternative guidebook to the city, inviting readers to engage with the town as a participant, not as an onlooker.

 

 

Ascending Scale

Hand-made book in an edition of thirty.
28 pages full-colour, 148 x 205mm
ISBN-13: 978-0-473-11491-6
published October 2006

This publication is an extension of the ideas from an exhibition that dealt with particles, cycles and loops and their integration into larger, more complex systems; ecological, atmospheric, optical and aural.

The text is a transcription of a conversation that I had with co-exhibitor Susie Pratt and critic Kate Montgomery that ranged across Hazel Henderson’s idea of “the love economy”, open-source software in South American government and the rejuvenation of out-dated technologies. Images of the work are organized so that they enter into dialog with one another.

As well as developing the book’s content, I designed, printed, bound and marketed the publication. It is held in a number of art and design libraries and the public library in Auckland as well as in the collection of the National Library of New Zealand.