building movements

Building Movements

Taking the building as a site for research and experimentation, Building Movements works directly upon the RMIT Design Hub, to interrupt habitual processes through the production of environments, drawings, and events. Following on from a research workshop held at the Design Hub in June 2013, these projects will reveal how we interact with, and are embedded within, architectural surrounds. Demanding an active engagement with the space leads to a deeper awareness of the mechanisms at play in the interaction between organisms and environments.

Installations by the Affective Environments architecture and interior design student workshop led by Chris Cottrell, Scott Andrew Elliott and Olivia Pintos–Lopez.
Projects by James Carey, Zuzana Kovar, Nick Skepper, Pia Ednie-Brown, and Adele Varcoe.
Curated by Pia Ednie-Brown.

A DRI associated event – supported by the Australian Research Council and a residency funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

breathing. space. no. 9: lift lecture

I gave a 30 minute lecture, “Air–Atmospheres–Breath–Affects,” in a public elevator at the RMIT Design Hub to a group of ten students. The lift space moved up and down according to the demands of other building users, and there were noticeable changes in air temperature between the lift itself, upper floors and the ground floor and basement levels. The presentation set up an unexpected environment for others to step into, a chance encounter with a short fragment of the lecture as they moved between floors. As a performance, the lecture created an intimate space where breath was shared, and the elevator was understood as a means of shifting parcels of air around the building.

Thanks to Scott Andrew Elliott for holding the projector!

Images to come…

breathing. space. no.6: trying to be clear about vagueness

2013-clear about vagueness-1
Helium balloon, string, zip–lock bag, a heap of grains of sand.

This project explores the relationship between levity and gravity through very simple means. Philosophical readings on vagueness describe the Sorites paradox, or the problem of the heap, where vagueness is understood in relation to the process of removing grains of sand from a heap, and at some point the sand ceases to be heap and becomes just a collection of grains. Balancing the balloon so that it neither floats up or falls to the ground provides a means to be precise about the quantity of sand the balloon must carry.

breathing. space. no.4: PPPPP collaboration

2013-ppppp-01I have been invited to take part in this live creative research performance, organised by the PPPPP Group. Over a one-hour period, a group of invited individuals will collaborate without speaking, but instead through direct exchange and interaction with various objects and materials brought into the space by the participants.

The setting is redolent of an open market bazaar or black market gambling setting, where there is a constant exploring of the terms of interaction, mediation, materials and exchange – but mediated through the materials at hand rather than spoken or written language.

The event takes place over several sessions on Friday May 3rd and Saturday May 4th at the Design Hub at RMIT.

breathing. space. no.2

Sunlight, passive ventilation system, space blanket, magnets.
1 minute.

A lightweight blanket made of polyurethane film with a thin coating of aluminium is draped over the fresh air outlet of a passive ventilation system. As air flows into the space, the blanket rises and falls, picking up varying reflections from inside and outside the space, and making visible this commonplace but subtle phenomenon.

breathing. space. no.1

Breathing. Space. is a collection of projects that are being developed to investigate a series of inter-related ideas: air, breath, vitality, pressure, interiority, ambience and atmosphere. Over the next three months I will produce, install and perform a range of small interventions which explore these inter-relationships and the thresholds between them.

Thanks to Hsu Han for the photo.