cloud sound

Daylight, lenses, weather sensors, software, sound and mixed media.
Exhibited in the group show Cloudy Sensoria.
Bundoora Homestead Art Centre, Melbourne.
October – December, 2012

This installation employs a camera obscura to project an image of the sky immediately outside the gallery into the darkened interior. Data from an array of various sensors located outside the space are routed into a piece of custom software, which manipulates dozens of small samples of sound to create an “aural cloud” that responds to the atmospheric conditions beyond the gallery space.

Cloud Sound takes known everyday phenomena — weather, optics — and transforms them into a space of delicate and lively experience.  The installation breaks our habitual attention, literally turning the world upside–down. By doing so, it draws attention to the complex relations that constitute experience, the various climatic and affective atmospheres involved.

paper : kissing the sky


A recently completed journal article, submitted for publication in the IDEA Journal issue ‘Writing/Drawing: Negotiating the Pleasures and Perils of Interiority. Edited by Sarah Treadwell.
Image courtesy of kalevkevad via flickr.

Abstract: Interiority typically constructs an ambience, or atmosphere, distinct from the unruly weather–atmosphere of the exterior. But this relationship is more complicated than mere separation; the exterior and interior are held together in a dynamic interplay of atmospheres, surfaces, materials and perceptions. This interplay is foregrounded in the work of James Turrell, whose projects engage in the complexity of this relationship, and embrace ambiguous and oscillating readings of inside and outside. Drawing attention to these inter–connections disrupts our habitual attention and invites a reconsideration of the categories we employ that allow us to make useful sense of the world.

This paper will discuss an installation by Turrell called Meeting, in reference to Sylvia Lavin’s notion of kissing, an extended metaphor which uses the term in both its bodily and geometric senses. Kissing will be used to think through the relationships present in an experience of Turrell’s work. I will examine how combinations of our bodies, atmosphere–weathers, and atmosphere–ambiences, intermix to create new, durationally dependent definitions of threshold, which complicate the interior and distinguish it from the discipline of architecture.

kitset 2.0


Laser cut model–making plywood, metal rings.

First exhibited at Phylogeny Weekend, John Hope Gateway building, Royal Botanic Gardens of Edinburgh, Scotland. February 2010.

Shown as part of a two person show Infinite Fondness, at Wolfson College, Oxford University, England. June 2010.

Exhibited at City Art Centre, as part of the Edinburgh International Science Festival, Edinburgh, Scotland. April 2012.

A development from the earlier three–dimensional drawing system, this Kitset was created specifically for an exhbition centred around the idea of phylogeny, or the evolutionary development and diversification of species. Modules are still based on the same underlying Penrose tiling geometry as the original Kitset, but are adapted to make them meaningful in a specific scientific context. A secondary timber colour also adds another dimension to a phylogenetic reading of the work.

workshop :

phylogeny weekend

I have developed a new version of Kitset for Phylogeny Weekend, an event organised by Hamer Dodds for the Royal Botanic Gardens of Edinburgh. Over the course of the weekend, the concept of phylogeny will be examined through various talks and workshops. These will provide an opportunity for thinkers, makers and players to consider how the interrelated subjects of time, place and relationship inform and affect creative and theoretical practices. Speakers include artist Gerhard Lang and academics Mike Phillips and Chris Speed.

conference : architecture/ECOLOGY

Kitset has been selected as a participatory intervention in the Architecture/ECOLOGY conference, organised by the University of Sheffield School of Architecture. The conference will examine various notions of ecology and their relationship to the discipline of architecture, and features speakers from around the UK and abroad. Keynote speakers are Neeraj Bhatia and Maya Przybylski of Infranet Lab.

kitset

Laser cut model-making plywood, metal rings.
exhibited at line-space-material, a solo exhibition at Evolution House, Edinburgh, Scotland.
August 2009.
and Architecture/ECOLOGY, an academic conference at the University of Sheffield, England.
November 2009.

Very slender, laser cut elements, based on geometry derived from Penrose tiling form a modular three–dimensional drawing system. Kitset is an open–ended piece of work open to collaboration and public engagement. From a simple kit of parts the work generates difference, variety and complexity, while defining and enclosing space. The resulting formations are located between spatial drawing and model–making.

light masonry construction

Two modified slide projectors, coloured filters.
exhibited at line-space-material, a solo exhibition at Evolution House, Edinburgh, Scotland.
August 2009.

Two projectors are placed in opposite corners of the space, with spatially specific inserts to compensate for “keystone” distortion, creating two co–incident orthogonal images. Projective drawing methods, used to generate the complex forms in masonry vaulting, inspired this geometric compensation. Here light, usually considered both ubiquitous and ephemeral, is considered as a material in its own right, through a process of shaping and layering.

cloud light

Half tone image on tracing paper.
4.6m x 3.1m
Exhibited at Patriothall Gallery, Edinburgh, Scotland.
June 2009

Representing a cloud, itself an accumulation of particles, through the process of half-tone imaging creates an edgeless field where matter is rendered through density, rather than line. Installed across the gallery windows, the work diffuses the light entering the space, producing a soft and subtly changing atmospheric effect.

cumbernauld receiving


Real-time audio manipulation of archival recordings, library catalogue record.
23 minutes 46s
Exhibited in Cumbernauld Town Centre, North Lanarkshire, Scotland.
March 2009
Now in the collection of Cumbernauld Public Library.
Also exhibited in the online audio exhibition “Location Location” on Stramash Space.
February–March 2010
And at La Ira Sónica, a sonic/new media arts festival in Coyoacán, Mexico City. July 2010

This work arose from my interest in the town’s history and the preservation of that history. Making parallels between the deterioration of archival material and the material of the town itself, a series of sound pieces were developed using recordings made from a VHS copy of the 1970 promotional film A Town For Tomorrow. These recordings are then digitally manipulated to create something which speaks of the present, while maintaining a connection to days past.