fare well tha’ nation

Readymade drawing from the head branch of the Royal Bank of Scotland.
250 x 200mm.
Edition of 10.

In Scotland each bank is responsible for printing its own money, a major point of difference with most other countries, and one that reflects the history of banking in Scotland. The Bank of Scotland was the first bank in Europe to successfully introduce paper currency, and a Scottish economist, John Law, helped establish banknotes as formal currency in France.

Made as I was preparing to leave Scotland, the title of this work is also a play on Adam Smith’s “The Wealth of Nations”, considered to be the founding text of modern capitalism and free-market economics.

This rarely seen one pound note produced by the Royal Bank of Scotland is taken out of circulation as a way of thinking about issues of value, nationhood, identity and representation. This seems particularly relevant in a period of financial instability as well as the political context of an upcoming referendum on Scottish independence.

LAND. HERE.

GPS trace from a 6.8km walk at the confluence of the Fox and Cook Rivers, South Westland, New Zealand.

This piece explores the propositional nature of mapping; the assertion that “this is there”. As a walked text piece the statement connects the direct experience of walking with a playfully banal statement of truth-testing.

sitting still drawing #1

Paired GPS drawing and 15 minute looping video.

These paired images offer complementary ways of thinking about stillness in the context of Fox Glacier and any attempt to represent it through mapping. One is an image of my GPS location taken over a 15 minute interval while sitting still, with the GPS device subject to “drift” due to the geometry and material nature of the glacier. The other image is a still from a 15 minute video, recorded at the same times as the GPS drawing. The video records the subtle changes to the glacier in real time; melting, cracking and changing light conditions.

work–in–progress :

glacier mapping

GPS data collected over three week period.

This is an early sketch of some of the material gathered during my recent residency period in Fox Glacier, New Zealand. During the residency I undertook a dozen or so walks on the glacier, recording each route with a GPS device. With this work, my interests are in the experience of moving and navigating on the ice.

Resolving this piece of work will require an examination of the relationship between the line, movement and material experience, which I hope to achieve through a process of making physical and spatialising the collected GPS data.

GPS drawing workshop

As Wild Creations artist in residence I offered to run a drawing workshop for pupils of Fox Glacier Primary School. Over three sessions I introduced the idea of drawing on the land, beginning with historical precedents such as the white horse chalk drawings in England and the Nazca drawings in Peru and moving on to work by Richard Long and Hamish Fulton. After a session on using Global Positioning System devices to record their movements, the students then created their own digital drawings by walking carefully designed routes; walking as a creative act, rather than a means of travelling.

Student participants were : Ollie Clarke, Jacob Sullivan, Liam Sullivan, Lucas Bron, Rhys Hopkins, Charlie Jewell, Matthew Morgan, Bayley Sullivan, Peter Williams, Taryn Hopkins, Rhiannon Barber and Naomi Halford.

Thanks to school staff Lesley Gillgren, Rebecca Griffiths and Linda Holmes.

kitset 2.0


Laser cut model–making plywood, metal rings.

First exhibited at Phylogeny Weekend, John Hope Gateway building, Royal Botanic Gardens of Edinburgh, Scotland. February 2010.

Shown as part of a two person show Infinite Fondness, at Wolfson College, Oxford University, England. June 2010.

Exhibited at City Art Centre, as part of the Edinburgh International Science Festival, Edinburgh, Scotland. April 2012.

A development from the earlier three–dimensional drawing system, this Kitset was created specifically for an exhbition centred around the idea of phylogeny, or the evolutionary development and diversification of species. Modules are still based on the same underlying Penrose tiling geometry as the original Kitset, but are adapted to make them meaningful in a specific scientific context. A secondary timber colour also adds another dimension to a phylogenetic reading of the work.

kitset

Laser cut model-making plywood, metal rings.
exhibited at line-space-material, a solo exhibition at Evolution House, Edinburgh, Scotland.
August 2009.
and Architecture/ECOLOGY, an academic conference at the University of Sheffield, England.
November 2009.

Very slender, laser cut elements, based on geometry derived from Penrose tiling form a modular three–dimensional drawing system. Kitset is an open–ended piece of work open to collaboration and public engagement. From a simple kit of parts the work generates difference, variety and complexity, while defining and enclosing space. The resulting formations are located between spatial drawing and model–making.

light masonry construction

Two modified slide projectors, coloured filters.
exhibited at line-space-material, a solo exhibition at Evolution House, Edinburgh, Scotland.
August 2009.

Two projectors are placed in opposite corners of the space, with spatially specific inserts to compensate for “keystone” distortion, creating two co–incident orthogonal images. Projective drawing methods, used to generate the complex forms in masonry vaulting, inspired this geometric compensation. Here light, usually considered both ubiquitous and ephemeral, is considered as a material in its own right, through a process of shaping and layering.

rule 110


Watercolour and pencil on paper, desk, chair, brushes, performance.
shown/performed at Inverleith House, Royal Botanic Gardens, Edinburgh, Scotland.
February 2009

This drawing and performance piece makes connections between the obsessive behaviour of scientists and artists. The drawing follows a simple mathematical algorithm used in theoretical botany, in which structures grow and interact, creating complex behaviour. The work alludes to the contribution each small unit makes to a larger field.