with fluidity

Two-channel audio walk
14 minutes 07s

Artists’ book
12 pages, 129mm x 181mm, plus double sided A3 fold-out poster
Designed and printed on risograph by Alice Bush at Ilam Press

Project launched Sunday July 12, 2015
Supported by The Physics Room.

With Fluidity is a project with Susie Pratt that consists of two parts: an audio walk and an artists’ book, which examine the tensions between Ōtākaro/Avon River as a founding icon of Christchurch city, and as a major contributor to the city’s destruction through earthquake induced liquefaction. The project takes the constantly shifting flows of Ōtākaro/Avon River as a model to propose alternative ways of thinking about and inhabiting the city.

The audio walk invites participants to be guided along the river while listening to audio that includes found sounds, manipulated sounds and fragments of spoken text. The artists’ book poses a series of questions, “How do the river and the city choreograph each other? What turns is the city making?” and responds to these through a visual essay.

audio reticulation

Computer cut vinyl, glass, sunlight, processed audio feedback.
1.8 x 2m
shown at High Street Project gallery, Christchurch, New Zealand.
May 2006

An audio processing network developed using the max/msp software formed the basis for this work. The vinyl-on-glass work makes visual the audio piece, offering an alternative way of reading systemic relationships. This notion of translation also occurs within the image as it is processed for vinyl cutting, a technology that works between the hand-made and machinic. Using light to activate the work firmly grounds it in the physical world.

test pattern

(three colour cycle)

Slide projectors, timers, electronics and mixed media.
2.5 x 3.2 x 1.9m approx.
shown at High Street Project gallery, Christchurch, New Zealand.
May 2006

This piece occupies a space between the still and moving image. Projections are reflected off rotating mirrored surfaces and diffused across a wall surface, transforming each image into a slowly orbiting field of its constituent parts.

This project references the organization of “bottom-up” systems; the original still image becomes the seed for the generation of a pattern-field. Timers create phase relationships and a visual feedback loop locates the original images as details in the larger context of the piece.