A.ジュド6

2015-AJ6-01Competition entry with Freya Robinson, Vivienne La and Nick Rebstadt.
Acoustics consultant: Dan Griffin, textiles consultant: Lijing Wang.
Finalist RMIT Meeting Pavilions competition.

A.ジュド6 formalises ideas of meeting and collaborative production through the layering of gridded surfaces to produce moiré effects. Both creative conversation and the moiré are emergent conditions dependent on dynamic material and interpersonal relationships. The geometries of the space are developed by analysing movement, rhythm and gesture, a process inspired by ‘kata’, a Japanese term for detailed choreographic sequences. The reticulated textile suspended within the structure advocates ideas of openness and collaboration, also permitting sight-lines into the space.

writing—between

Collaborative writing project with Scott Andrew Elliott.
Ongoing.

With this experimental writing project we are trying to write between, and around, and extend, an idea of tentativeness, and develop this experience through writing and reading. We are doing this by writing together, either simultaneously into the same document, or cutting and editing two separate texts together using a variety of strategies. These texts are then re-worked and re-edited to draw out new and unexpected concepts, and to creatively generate uncertainty.

conference : moved —

on atmospheres and affects

2013-interstices-breath-doodles

My paper “Drawing of Breath: a provisional diagram for the reciprocal relations between atmospheres and affects” has been accepted for the upcoming Interstices conference “Moved: On Atmospheres and Affects” which is to be held in Auckland, New Zealand from November 22–24. Gernot Böhme will give the keynote presentation. Further details are available on the Interstices website.

Abstract:
From a young age I have always enjoyed exhaling into the cold dry air of wintertime and delighting in how breath, made visible, dissipates into the wider atmosphere. Evidence of the atmospheric differences within and without gives rise to wonderment, and in turn, a will — to the point of hyperventilation — to create more and more breath-clouds. This play of breath is an example of the distinctions between affects and atmospheres and their reciprocal folding together. The commonplaceness of breathing offers productive ways of understanding the remaking of self and environment and their ambiguous inter-relationship. The act of breathing is an intimate, energetic exchange between the world and our bodies; sustaining us, it is also a distributed act of collective connection. To breathe in is to draw the world inwards, to take in its forces and to draw sustenance from it. To breathe out is to expel something very personal into the public domain, where others may in turn draw it inwards in a constant process of exchange. Absorbing and being affected by diffuse, ephemeral qualities of space, means making sense of atmospheres and affects requires understanding bodily engagement.
Numerous art and architectural projects make specific use of breath as a motif or modus operandi, two of which I will examine in detail. A discussion of Decosterd and Rahm’s Hormonium will focus on how the drawing inwards of atmospheres via the respiratory and endocrine systems creates internally registered bodily affects. The second project, Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s extension to the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, DC, emphasises the registration of breath as a collective act in the public sphere. They see the project as making visible the “air of democracy,” via an inflatable public space for lectures and discussion. These projects, while using breath in quite different registers, build on an understanding of bodies and environments as being intertwined, if still separable. This condition of being together-but-separable is explored in Ben Anderson’s essay Affective Atmospheres. I similarly investigate the always in-process nature of atmospheres in this paper, drawing conscious attention to the process of breathing as a specific mechanism for becoming aware of the interrelationships between affects and atmospheres, bodies and environments.

building movements #2 (box)

building movements #2-3Perforated metal sheet, aluminium angle and mixed media.
2.5 x 2.0 x 2.4m

A perforated metal box the same dimensions of the lift interior blocks a straightforward exit from the lift. Building users are invited to physically push this box (which is housed inside a second perforated metal box) in order to open up a narrow exit corridor. This physical relationship inverts the passive user— active building dynamic present within the lift interior, and the process of moving these perforated screens creates a series of moiré effects which are seen against the gridded circle pattern of the building facade.

with Scott Andrew Elliott, Olivia Pintos Lopez and Katherine Brown, Daniel Vito Colaneri, Leanne Failla, Stephanie Gleeson, Frances Gordon, Ben Warren, Freya Robinson, Jack Ryan and Jaime Vella.

teaching workshop : affective envrionments

AE poster
In this intensive workshop elective students will take part in the construction of an installation project at the Design Hub developed by Chris Cottrell (RMIT), Scott Andrew Elliott (Aalto University, Finland) and Olivia Pintos-Lopez (RMIT).The course will begin with an introduction to a series of experimental art–architecture spatial practices and ways in which the construction of environments can test and probe relationships between the body and architecture.

Students will participate with the building process in creating an experimental installation, sourcing found materials, learning and developing techniques of making, engaging in team work, experiencing the challenges of collaborative, open-ended exploratory process first-hand, developing techniques for careful and intensive documentation of a process, and learning about research through the practice of making.

This course focuses on developing critical design practice by constructing experimental spaces, particularly in getting to know the hands-on practical skills for realizing a medium/large-scale collaborative project, and how this process of construction and its documentation can become integral to a research enquiry.

studio teaching :

ONE to ONE

Ingrid CalameIngrid Calame.
detail from #346 Drawing (Tracing from the Perry Street Project Wading Pool, Buffalo, NY), 2011.

ONE to ONE was a Masters of Architecture studio that I developed and co-taught at the University of Melbourne. The studio investigated materiality and immateriality through methods of architectural representation, focusing on an expanded notion of architectural drawing. The design process began with material/immaterial explorations, before moving to the production of a detail drawing at 1:1 scale. Students were  asked to consider material and spatial relationships with the body, before developing a larger architectural proposition.

analog part two

Mixed media/digital video.
13s
first published in The Pander, August 2000
shown in Viewfinder, Auckland Public Library/New Zealand Film Archive.
April – May 2006
now in the collection of the New Zealand Film Archive.

The first really good thing I ever made. Its 13 second duration the result of two intense weeks; learning digital modelling and animation software, rendering, planning, filming and re-editing. The project interrogates authorship, minimalism and decay in relation to architectural and moving image production.