cloud sound

Daylight, lenses, weather sensors, software, sound and mixed media.
Exhibited in the group show Cloudy Sensoria.
Bundoora Homestead Art Centre, Melbourne.
October – December, 2012

This installation employs a camera obscura to project an image of the sky immediately outside the gallery into the darkened interior. Data from an array of various sensors located outside the space are routed into a piece of custom software, which manipulates dozens of small samples of sound to create an “aural cloud” that responds to the atmospheric conditions beyond the gallery space.

Cloud Sound takes known everyday phenomena — weather, optics — and transforms them into a space of delicate and lively experience.  The installation breaks our habitual attention, literally turning the world upside–down. By doing so, it draws attention to the complex relations that constitute experience, the various climatic and affective atmospheres involved.

LAND. HERE. publication

LAND_HERE cover

This publication collects a number of works from my Wild Creations residency in Fox Glacier, including student works from the GPS drawing workshop that I offered. Though documenting mostly video works, they are adapted to the book format to give a sense of their intended presentation. The publication is introduced by Joe Gerlach, a lecturer in geography at the University of Oxford.

There are plans for a physical edition of the publication, but for now it is available for download as an electronic publication.

fare well tha’ nation

Readymade drawing from the head branch of the Royal Bank of Scotland.
250 x 200mm.
Edition of 10.

In Scotland each bank is responsible for printing its own money, a major point of difference with most other countries, and one that reflects the history of banking in Scotland. The Bank of Scotland was the first bank in Europe to successfully introduce paper currency, and a Scottish economist, John Law, helped establish banknotes as formal currency in France.

Made as I was preparing to leave Scotland, the title of this work is also a play on Adam Smith’s “The Wealth of Nations”, considered to be the founding text of modern capitalism and free-market economics.

This rarely seen one pound note produced by the Royal Bank of Scotland is taken out of circulation as a way of thinking about issues of value, nationhood, identity and representation. This seems particularly relevant in a period of financial instability as well as the political context of an upcoming referendum on Scottish independence.

LAND. HERE.

GPS trace from a 6.8km walk at the confluence of the Fox and Cook Rivers, South Westland, New Zealand.

This piece explores the propositional nature of mapping; the assertion that “this is there”. As a walked text piece the statement connects the direct experience of walking with a playfully banal statement of truth-testing.

sitting still drawing #1

Paired GPS drawing and 15 minute looping video.

These paired images offer complementary ways of thinking about stillness in the context of Fox Glacier and any attempt to represent it through mapping. One is an image of my GPS location taken over a 15 minute interval while sitting still, with the GPS device subject to “drift” due to the geometry and material nature of the glacier. The other image is a still from a 15 minute video, recorded at the same times as the GPS drawing. The video records the subtle changes to the glacier in real time; melting, cracking and changing light conditions.

fox glacier valley

Vertically tracking video projection
7 minutes 44s

Constructed from video footage recorded while walking in Fox Glacier valley, this video slowly tracks up the space in which it is shown. It forms a vertical section of the landscape, from the Fox River, up the valley and finally on to Fox Glacier itself. The work attempts to create a spatial document of this environment without resorting to cartographic encoding, seeking a balance between abstraction and the experiential act of walking through the landscape.

track cutting fox glacier

Stereo Field Recording
2 minutes 15s
Recorded early morning, 9 December 2010.

This work approaches the physicality of Fox Glacier, through a recording of guiding staff maintaining access on to the glacier. Each day staff work to re-cut a series of steps and pathways into the surface, making modifications to allow for the melting and shifting of the ice. The materiality and physicality of this small scale and repetitive act is in turn linked to the larger scale dynamics of the glacier as a whole.

perceptions of greenland

I have helped to develop Perceptions of Greenland, an exhibition of images by Edinburgh based artists and scientists at Tent Gallery. It aims to reveal parallels in the ways various disciplines observe and interact with this arctic environment and is organised by ASCUS : art science collaborative. Contributors include Mark Eischeid, Hamer Dodds, Pete Nienow, Ian Bartholomew, Jennifer Littlejohn and Malize McBride.

Opening event:  12-2pm, Friday July 16.
The show is visible from the street and will run continuously until July 23.

kitset 2.0


Laser cut model–making plywood, metal rings.

First exhibited at Phylogeny Weekend, John Hope Gateway building, Royal Botanic Gardens of Edinburgh, Scotland. February 2010.

Shown as part of a two person show Infinite Fondness, at Wolfson College, Oxford University, England. June 2010.

Exhibited at City Art Centre, as part of the Edinburgh International Science Festival, Edinburgh, Scotland. April 2012.

A development from the earlier three–dimensional drawing system, this Kitset was created specifically for an exhbition centred around the idea of phylogeny, or the evolutionary development and diversification of species. Modules are still based on the same underlying Penrose tiling geometry as the original Kitset, but are adapted to make them meaningful in a specific scientific context. A secondary timber colour also adds another dimension to a phylogenetic reading of the work.